Recursion by Blake Crouch

Wow. Just…wow.

My mind is still reeling from this novel! Blake Crouch has done it again. In this novel, Helena Smith is a neuroscientist who sets out to create a device to allow those with memory loss to experience their preserved memories over and over again, in light of her mother losing her memory to dementia. Barry Sutton, a NYC copy, is investing a new illness called False Memory Syndrome, which causes its victims to suddenly remember entire lifetimes that they never experienced.

From the first page I was immediately hooked. While it became a little confusing when the story jumped around multiple timelines, the root of the story was in humanity and the desire to change the past if you had the option. It addresses the dangers of such abilities falling into the wrong hands and, how humankind can’t handle that type of power. No spoilers, but the ending of the novel was beautifully written, philosophical in nature, surprising and I was completely satisfied by the conclusion. With sci-fi novels like this I find that the conclusions tend to be either predictable or disappointing, but Recursion exceeded all expectations.

Thank you to Net Galley for sending me an ARC of this book!